All Blogposts tagged as 'peter law'

  • Games you play in the dark: Blindfolds

    11 March 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    The title of this post is misleading – blindfold games aren’t games you play in the dark, pretty much by definition. If it was dark anyway, why would you bother putting a blindfold on someone?

    The point of blindfold games is the asymmetry. Blind Man’s Buff, and the mass of other “blind man” Victorian parlour games, all demand that a blindfolded player either catches, or else identifies, someone who can see. There’s an earlier pig-chasing game that was reported at some village fairs, where blindfolded players tried to catch a pig with bells on – and even in this case, where all the players are blindfold, the point of the game depends on some people being able to see; it’s not the sort of thing you’d play without spectators.

    The title of this post is misleading – blindfold games aren’t games you play in the dark, pretty much by definition. If it was dark anyway, why would you bother putting a blindfold on someone?

    The point of blindfold games is the asymmetry. Blind Man’s Buff, and the mass of other “blind man” Victorian parlour games, all demand that a blindfolded player either catches, or else identifies, someone who can see. There’s an earlier pig-chasing game that was reported at some village fairs, where blindfolded players tried to catch a pig with bells on – and even in this case, where all the players are blindfold, the point of the game depends on some people being able to see; it’s not the sort of thing you’d play without spectators.

    Read on...

  • Games you play in the dark: Focus

    10 March 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 1 comment

    A lot of in-the-dark games use the absence of visual cues to make sure players concentrate on something else: on sounds, typically, or sometimes touch. Somethin’ Else’s Papa Sangre is the recent, staggeringly successful example. Since it’s an iPhone game it’s not necessarily played in the literaldark, but players have no visual cues at all, and have only sound to respond to; which for a screen-based game is as meaningfully “in the dark” as it gets.

    Read on...