All Blogposts tagged as 'food'

  • Easter Games

    28 March 2013 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    Eggselent, by Midiman

    We’re in the middle of a Kickstarter for our Tiny Games App (BACK US, IT WILL BE AMAZING), and it’s Easter weekend, so we were going to design some Tiny Games for Easter – but when we began coming up with ideas, we kept getting distracted by all the quick, fun, silly, gorgeous Easter games that already exist. So instead, here’s some Easter games in the spirit of the Tiny Games project, but with a lineage that’s sometimes hundreds of years old – and a lot more eggs.

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  • Books on the Hide&Seek Shelves: The Art of Eating

    23 May 2011 | by Holly Gramazio | 0 comments

    (This post is part of an occasional series about books on the Hide&Seek bookshelves and why we have them.)

    The Art of Eating is a collection of food writing by MFK Fisher. It’s really lovely – Fisher was one of the twentieth century’s best food writers, and The Art of Eating is a great collection. It has recipes, and essays, and advice, and history, and little snippets of stories, and then some more recipes, everything from rationing-era tomato-soup cake to hare pate.

    It’s on the shelves because… well, here are some of the things that you need to do when you write up the rules for a game:

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  • Traditional Christmas games… OF PERIL

    16 December 2010 | by Holly Gramazio | 2 comments

    In the run-up to Christmas, we would like to heartily recommend that you do not, repeat do not, cast aside your usual pastimes for some Victorian Christmas games. We’ve just spent an hour poking around, and it turns out that in the nineteenth century, the most popular British Christmas games were those that involved grave risk of injury. There’s “Shoe the Wild Mare”, in which you balance a plank between two chairs, stand on top of it, and try to hit its underside with a hammer ten times without falling off. There’s “Hot Cockles”, in which one player shuts their eyes and everyone else takes it in turn to hit them on the back, until the eyes-shut player guesses which blow belonged to who. And there’s Snapdragon, which combines the cheery warm let’s-all-gather-round-a-table traditions of Christmas with (a) alcohol, and (b) fire.

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